What is Cannabigerol?

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You’ve heard of CBD and THC, which are both well-researched and well-known cannabinoids. These chemicals are found in cannabis and hemp plants, and they have unique effects on our bodies. Another cannabinoid everyone needs to know is cannabigerol, or CBG.

There are dozens of known cannabinoids, and all of them come from CBG. This is why CBG is called the “mother cannabinoid.” In other words, when hemp or cannabis “cures,” CBG turns into other cannabinoids like CBD and THC.

First discovered in the 1960s, CBG hasn’t been studied as much as CBD or THC, and there’s a lot we don’t know about it. However, we do know that it doesn’t seem to intoxicate people. Some scientific research suggests that it has a range of health benefits.

Although most strains of cannabis and hemp contain less than 1 percent CBG by the time it gets to you, more and more companies are working on creating strains that are high in CBG. While they aren’t as common as CBD, CBG products are becoming more and more popular.

Here’s everything you need to know about CBG.

What exactly does cannabigerol do?

While we’re not yet sure exactly what health benefits CBG has, a lot of promising research has suggested CBG has a range of different uses. But, as a 2017 review on CBG points out, CBG needs to be studied further.

Here’s what we do know about the potential uses of CBG:

  •  CBG may have anti-inflammatory properties. In a study conducted on mice with inflammatory bowel disease, CBG seemed to reduce inflammation.
  • CBG may be neuroprotective. A 2015 study showed that CBG seemed to protect neurons in mice with Huntington’s disease, a neurodegenerative disease.
  • CBG might be able to treat bladder dysfunctions. A 2015 study tested five different cannabinoids for how they affected the bladder. The study concluded that CBG had the most potential for treating certain bladder dysfunctions.
  • CBG might be able to fight cancer. A 2014 study showed that CBG slowed the growth of colon cancer cells in mice.
  • CBG might reduce nausea and vomiting. A 2016 study concludes that CBG might have the potential to soothe nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting, particularly in chemotherapy patients.
  • CBG might be anti-bacterial. Research shows that CBG might be able to kill Staphylococcus bacteria, which cause staph infections.
  • CBG might be able to boost your mood. The “bliss molecule,” anandamide, is associated with feelings of happiness and relaxation. CBG seems to increase the production of anandamide, according to some studies. The cannabinoid also works as a GABA reuptake inhibitor, meaning that it might reduce anxiety and promote feelings of calm.
  • CBG might be able to treat glaucoma. A 2008 study suggests that CBG reduces intraocular pressure, which means it might treat glaucoma.

Future research will tell us exactly how CBG can benefit us.

How are CBG products made?

As an article in Forbes points out, CBG is the most expensive cannabinoid to produce.

Because CBG is the “mother cannabinoid,” strains that are high in THC and CBD tend to be low in CBG. This is because CBG synthesizes into THC and CBD. Usually, manufacturers would wait for plants to mature so that most of the CBG has time to convert into THC and CBD. But, in order to extract a lot of CBG from a plant, manufacturers will have to use young plants, which means that they miss out on the THC and CBD.

So, manufacturers have to make a difficult choice: let the plant mature and get THC and CBD, or use a young plant that’s high in CBG. If they go for CBG, it can be expensive to produce because there’s usually very little CBG in each plant.

Fortunately, more and more growers are breeding CBG-rich strains. Some growers are working on strains that are over 10 percent CBG.

Where can I buy CBG products?

Nowadays, CBD products can be bought online, in cannabis shops, and even in your average health store. But where can you buy CBG products?

If you use cannabis or hemp, you’ve definitely ingested CBG before. Small amounts of CBG will be found in most cannabis and hemp buds, as well as in full-spectrum CBD products. This is because a tiny amount of CBG will naturally exist in all cannabis and hemp.

However, if you’d like to try the magic of CBG for yourself, you want a product that’s high in CBG. Fortunately, we have a range of high-CBG products in our store.

If you’re interested in smoking CBG-rich hemp, we have numerous hemp flowers such as Cinderella, Lemon Cream Diesel, and OJ. If you’d like something strong that is a unique smoking experience, try our CBG Asteroids (Moon Rocks). We also have CBG kief and hash.

Not keen on smoking CBG? Try our CBG isolate tincture, full-spectrum tinctures, and CBG capsules.

How do I know whether a CBG product is good quality?

As with CBD, not all CBG products are of the same quality. Since CBG products aren’t regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), you’ll need to do your own research before buying CBG.

When buying CBG, it’s essential to look for products that are tested by an independent lab. Check out the company’s website for certificates of analysis (COAs) or third-party lab reports. These lab reports should confirm how much CBG is in the product. It should also specify how much of the other cannabinoids are in the product.

The lab report should also tell you that the products contain no mold, heavy metals, or pesticides, as these impurities can be toxic.

Naturally, all of Black Tie CBD’s products are tested by a third-party lab: just check out our product pages if you’d like to take a look at the lab reports.

It’s important to chat with your healthcare provider before trying a new supplement, particularly if you are on chronic medication. Your doctor is best equipped to help you figure out whether CBG is worth trying.

While CBG needs to be studied further, it’s a fascinating cannabinoid that seems to have the potential to treat a range of conditions, including inflammation, glaucoma, and neurodegenerative diseases. Remember to talk to your doctor before trying any new supplement, including CBG.

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